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TSP REAL Webinar - Shared screen with speaker view
Shandy Hauk
20:59
I am here for you E!
Annie Bergman
21:16
Excited to be here!
Jonathan Rubin (He/Him)
27:27
It seems to me that active learning can take much more diverse forms than lecturing. So how are these researchers (Freeman et al) able to represent "active learning" as one unified comparison group (esp. across all of science!)
April Strom (she/her)
29:13
@Jonathan, the approach by Freeman et al. was essentially a lecture vs "anything not lecture in any amount”…
Jonathan Rubin (He/Him)
29:53
Thx!
John Hershberger
31:00
Was that workshop an extra hour of class, or using class time?
Sandra Laursen
31:39
@Jonathan - my take on Freeman is that it's a pretty robust signal if we're counting anything that can be labeled fairly as active learning (and they do discuss what they counted or not). Within that large and messy group, there are undoubtedly some things that work better than others, but that wasn't the research question they were studying.
Hyejin Park
33:56
Did instructors who implemented learner-centered teaching methods in their classrooms use traditional forms of assessments when assessing their students’ learning?
Leigh Noble
34:06
Somewhat ironic we are in a lecture now?
Elizabeth Thoren (she/her)
35:12
50%?
Kristin Kurianski
35:19
30%?
Erin Munro Krull
35:22
30%
Jeffrey Adler
35:25
80%
Stan Yoshinobu
35:36
I don't think it’s ironic. We are not students trying to learn something and we can't "discover” Estrella’s thinking by doing active learning.
Andrew Ross
35:41
I have no idea what my colleagues do because we don't have course coordination, and we never have time to visit each other's classrooms.
Rick Cleary (he/him) Babson College
36:04
I wonder if students would report the same percentages if we asked them?
Elizabeth Thoren (she/her)
36:16
Good question...
Andrew Ross
36:25
The X-PIPS-M survey suite does ask students about how class time is spent.
Erin Munro Krull
38:38
How many studies look at other things besides grades? What about course evaluations and other measures of students' reaction to the course?
Katherine Stevenson
38:38
Think how many such experiments have happened out there without being published!?
Bob Sachs
39:02
Math people do tend to go almost all or almost nothing on many things
Sandra Laursen
39:35
@Rick, our group has experimented a bit with this. Students are pretty good at reporting some strategies, such as group work or discussions that involve more than one student. Reporting "lecture” is harder for them, interestingly: Students think instructors talk a lot (we probably do). They report any kind of instructor talk as "lecture", not just formal presentations of material.
Sandra Laursen
41:39
@Erin, the Freeman meta-analysis looked only at studies that reported exam scores or DFW rates.
Katherine Stevenson
44:42
If we make professional development part of their normal work rather than an add on.
Kathryn
46:01
I would like to see the results of these questions asked of introductory level mathematics courses.
Jim Sandefur
46:08
I have read several studies in which faculty attended professional development programs but still did not change.
John Hershberger
46:44
What about support from Dean/Provost and above?
Rob Indik
47:01
was there any difference in the class sizes re attitudes?
Carrie Muir
47:05
There has to be the time and resources provided to implement what's learned in professional development, not just access to the professional development.
Benjamin Braun
47:05
@Jim But there seems to be a lot of value to having ongoing learning communities, which can arise from PD programs
Stephanie Douglass
47:59
Jim- My dissertation was on PD and teachers not taking what was learned back to their classroom. I found that if they didn't see it easy to use or applicable to their content, they didn't incorporate the PD.
Kathrine Johnson
49:06
We are currently discussing how to compensate adjunct instructors for professional development and how to incorporate teaching training for graduate teaching assistants. Isolated professional development has not been effective (enough); we are looking at ongoing year-long programs.
Nina Juliana White
50:17
comathinquiry.org
Nina Juliana White
50:32
https://www.comathinquiry.org/
Katherine Stevenson
50:47
@Kathrine, we are creating a collaboration between our university fac. Dev. and our department. The hope is that this is more impactful.
Sandra Laursen
51:26
OPEN Math: https://www.maa.org/programs-and-communities/professional-development/open-math
Natalie Naehrig
52:09
We have just become a new chapter for the COMMIT in the Pacific Northwest. https://sites.google.com/uw.edu/pnw-commit/home
Haynes R Miller
52:48
Another source for many ideas around undergraduate mathematics education is the Online Seminar on Undergraduate Mathematics Education, OLSUME, https://olsume.org/seminar-archive/
Gaitri Yapa (she/her)
52:58
Unfortunately, OPEN Math Summer session registration seems closed now.
Kathrine Johnson
53:00
@Katherine, we have a wonderful Center for Teaching and Learning, and our department has partnered with them more than once on specific initiatives. It's been very helpful, and they are involved in this new effort as well. I hope it works well for you!
Stan Yoshinobu
53:16
The Academy of Inquiry Based Learning (AIBL) also is a good place to start to learn about IBL methods. http://www.inquirybasedlearning.org
Rick Cleary (he/him) Babson College
53:26
Really good point about PD for adjuncts. Many of us at have felt the tension between teaching large sections with full time faculty vs. smaller sections but with adjuncts. Each presents some obstacles to active learning.
Bob Sachs
54:06
We created a Teaching and Learning Seminar, mostly in math but monthly in a STEM community at large
Katherine Stevenson
55:06
And understanding of bias in Student evaluations is critical too.
Jonathan Rubin (He/Him)
55:53
Evaluation of teaching practices, in my experience, is much harder to do fairly than it might sound at first glance.
Kathrine Johnson
56:40
I love the perspective that we should focus on a culture of thoughtful teaching practice rather than “adopt active learning”
Katherine Stevenson
57:57
Coordinator can make it easier to explore new teaching methods.
Sandra Laursen
58:01
re evaluation of teaching - lots of good resources and tools from the TEval project, https://www.teval.net/
Andrew Ross
58:14
Getting faculty to meet every week to talk about how an intro class is going is hard! Everyone says they don't have enough time to do that.
Gaitri Yapa (she/her)
58:39
UBC has general resources (video clips, 2-page summaries, and a guidebook) that are evidence based, for developing active learning available at https://skylight.science.ubc.ca/resources
John Hershberger
58:42
That's true, Andrew. We have twice semesterly meetings
Sarah Clark
58:43
Collaborative culture around teaching is so key. Our department is really great with that - when someone tries something great they are always willing to share with other instructors. We have coordinators for most of the large enrollment lower level classes, and it's so helpful.
Erick Chastain
58:54
what kinds of resources are out there for new teachers of active learning?
Bob Sachs
59:48
Will Estrella's slides be shared?
Gaitri Yapa (she/her)
01:00:11
@Erick: Please check https://skylight.science.ubc.ca/resources
doree
01:00:17
We plan to share slides and video on the TPSE-math website, as well as the bibliograph
Michelle Cirillo
01:00:21
@Erick - here's a nice resource to get started: https://www.maa.org/programs-and-communities/curriculum%20resources/instructional-practices-guide
Elizabeth Thoren (she/her)
01:06:22
I'm curious about the effect of “survivor bias" for students in abstract algebra.
Hyejin Park
01:06:40
I wonder how TIMES participating instructors used active learning in their classrooms. What pedagogical strategies did they use for active learning?
Benjamin Braun
01:06:46
Were the instructors doing active learning in TIMES explicitly trained to be aware of impact of gender in groups etc?
Andrew Ross
01:07:07
Here's an interesting NSF-funded MOOC for STEM instructors about doing more inclusive teaching: https://www.inclusivestemteaching.org/
Shandy Hauk
01:07:20
I too wonder about the distribution: % women and % men in each population in the TIMES comparison 🙂
Chi_Kou
01:07:23
Thank you.
Shandy Hauk
01:07:35
Did a larger % of women FINISH the class to take the test?
Juliana Belding
01:07:36
Thank you - a lot of food for thought (and action).
Raluca I. Rosca
01:08:38
Same questions as James, also wondering if there was any question about instructor introducing group norms /group rules if groupwork was instroduced.
Annie Bergman
01:08:38
Great talk Stre! Thanks for breaking down and explaining the variation in what is considered active learning.
Bob Sachs
01:09:04
Also wonder about any prereq courses for abstract algebra -- proofs course? Which topic(s)?
Benjamin Braun
01:10:17
I have tried to move away from the idea that active learning is giving up authority. We are still the authority in the course. We're using that authority in different ways with active learning, but we're responsible for doing a lot of extra social engineering.
Christy A-L (she/her)
01:10:54
More details about the TIMES study is here. Someone asked about gender composition. Differential equations was about 1/4 women, Linear algebra was about 1/3, and abstract algebra was about 40% women (for students of TIMES instructors)
Kathrine Johnson
01:11:05
@Benjamin - absolutely!
Bob Sachs
01:11:48
@Jonathan -- YES, great question
Sandra Laursen
01:11:54
@Ben, I like that construction. The power dynamic is not gone, but there is more partnership in the building of knowledge
Shandy Hauk
01:12:01
Hmm. Interesting experience (lower attendance)... not similar at my institution.
Kate Stevenson
01:12:23
I’d love to think with a group on how AMS/MAA/AMATYC could work with the professional development community to support departmental changes on thier campuses.
Christy A-L (she/her)
01:12:50
Great talk, Stre!
Stan Yoshinobu
01:13:06
Thank you, Estrella! Great talk!
Bob Sachs
01:13:10
Thanks Estrella!
doree
01:13:12
Fabulous info and insights, Estrella. Thank you!!!
Cindy Wyels (she/her; on unceded Chumash lands)
01:13:15
@Kate - agreed!
Julie Hendrickson
01:13:16
TPSE Resources: https://www.tpsemath.org/careers-outside-academia
Kate Stevenson
01:13:20
Another wonderful talk Stre!!!
Karen Gaines (she/her)
01:13:25
@Kate AMATYC has an NSF project (Teaching for PROWESS) which is focused on this very thing.
Chris Eagle
01:13:29
Thank you so much for sharing. This was very valuable!
doree
01:13:32
https://www.tpsemath.org/
Camelia Karimianpour
01:13:33
Thank you, Estrella!
Elizabeth Thoren (she/her)
01:13:37
Thank you Estrella!
Kate Stevenson
01:13:42
@Karen, I'd love to touch base.
Scott A. Wolpert
01:13:44
https://www.tpsemath.org/careers-outside-academia
Lisa Savcak
01:13:45
Thank you, Estrella. Agreed. Great presentation!
Paula Wilhite
01:13:47
Excellent presentation! Thank you.
Cindy Wyels (she/her; on unceded Chumash lands)
01:13:48
Thank you, Estrella!
Ahsan Chowdhury
01:13:48
Thanks for the talk Estrella
Ralph Pantozzi
01:13:58
Thank you!
John Osoinach
01:13:58
Thanks for the talk!
Caroline Haddad
01:14:03
Thank you Estrella!
Kathrine Johnson
01:14:12
Thank you!!
Benjamin Braun
01:14:16
Thank you for the interesting talk!
Jonathan Rubin (He/Him)
01:14:16
Thanks for the talk & the chat!!
Casey Griffin
01:14:20
Thank you Estrella!
Juliana Belding
01:14:21
^^
Gaitri Yapa (she/her)
01:14:22
@ Kate & @ Karen: I'd love to connect too, if it's okay.
Ron Hetrick
01:14:29
Thank you!
Michelle Cirillo
01:14:42
Thanks Estrella - nice talk!
Maria G Meehan
01:15:06
Thank you
Jim Sandefur
01:15:27
I believe there is both a cultural link and gender link to succeeding in active learning. A study of the learning styles and study strategies of Brunei secondary students (Shahrill et al., 2013) found that the high mathematics achievers have a more auditory-language learning style than the less successful mathematics students. They also found that females, who were more successful in mathematics, scored higher on visual-language and auditory-visual kinesthetic learning styles than their male counterparts. On the other hand, in an exploratory study of South African mathematics students, Bosman and Schulze (2018) found that different learning styles were conducive to better or worse performance. In this study, the higher achievers tended to prefer to work individually, in contrast to the Brunei study.
Gaitri Yapa (she/her)
01:15:29
@Estrella: Thank you so much for summarizing the results from Freeman study for Math!!
Timothy Stoelinga
01:16:01
Highly informative. Thank you!
Ben Galluzzo
01:16:05
Thanks, Estrella!
Jennifer Laveglia (she/her)
01:16:18
Great talk to think about over the summer when planning changes for the fall. Thanks, Estrella, for the talk and everyone else for the robust resources in the chat!
Ron Hetrick
01:17:10
Maybe already mentioned, but if not, POGIL project has a lot of material on group roles and structured work in groups in class
Christy A-L (she/her)
01:17:25
The best work I've seen on inquiry and equity is coming out of biology in their work on high /medium /etc. structure courses
Kathrine Johnson
01:18:28
TBL (Team-Based Learning) also has a robust structure for team work for learning.
Bret Benesh
01:18:42
@Hyejin and @Ben: I was a TIMES fellow, and I can answer a couple of your questions about your training. For the active learning part, we had extensive training to (1) have students work on the items in small groups and (2) have a large group discussion that develops a common understanding and relates the class’s language to the standard language of abstract algebra. I believe that this was a four step process. @Ben: We did not have any formal training about the role of gender in groups, but Estrella several times gave us informal training (she was the first person to tell me that the most effective groups are majority minority). It was excellent PD for active learning, but it was not focused on gender.
Benjamin Braun
01:19:19
@Bret thank you!
Ron Hetrick
01:19:44
Link to quick info on POGIL suggested group roles: https://pogil.org/uploads/attachments/ck6uz5qa40h1abvx41u84yni6-pogillaminatedrolecards-final.pdf
Kathrine Johnson
01:19:54
http://www.teambasedlearning.org/ TBL also has some research on the value of team diversity.
Benjamin Braun
01:21:42
@Erick if you read some literature on organizational management, there are huge common themes with IBL and active learning. A lot of this is just how to humanely lead a group of people to do good creative work and support each other.
Raluca I. Rosca
01:21:57
Not just looking at cognitive learning but also at the self-efficacy?
Sandra Laursen
01:21:59
thanks, Stre!
Dr. Shannon A. Patterson
01:22:00
Thank you!
Ahsan Chowdhury
01:22:04
thank you
Karen Crounse (she/her/hers)
01:22:04
Thanks so much!
Adam Fletcher
01:22:07
Thanks, Estrella!
Hyejin Park
01:22:08
Thank you for a great talk!
Bennet Goeckner
01:22:10
thank you!
Christine Haught
01:22:10
Thank you!
Nicholas Zoller
01:22:11
Thank you!
Frank Farris
01:22:14
Thanks!
Kat Shultis (she/her)
01:22:14
Thank you!
Matt Jones
01:22:15
Thank you!
Bret Benesh
01:22:16
Thanks, Stre!
Irma Stevens
01:22:17
Thank you!
Chris Sabino (he/him)
01:22:21
Thank you!!
Pablo Duran
01:22:21
Thank you!
Bernd Sing
01:22:25
Thank you!
Erick Chastain
01:22:26
thank you
Juliana Belding
01:22:26
THANK YOU!
Gaitri Yapa (she/her)
01:22:28
Thanks for organizing!
Lisa Rice (she/her)
01:22:29
Thank you!
Stan Yoshinobu
01:22:29
👏